Two Cars

The residents of Lathropworld went on a minor spending spree this weekend.

 

We’ve been blessed with an inheritance from my grandfather’s estate–which, truth be told was a little bit of a surprise because I’d grown up hearing he and my grandmother promise all of us grandkids and our parents that the only thing they were leaving to us when they died was a smile.

 

Needless to say, he did a little better than that.

 

So his children, grandchildren, and even great-grandchildren have received something. And it’s been mostly even within each generation, and pretty fair across all generations.

 

Unless you’re Patrick, who technically was the heir to my grandfather’s car, but due to his age and whatever other requirements inheritance carries with it, I’m the temporary owner until I can sign it over to him.

 

No, Patrick can’t drive yet, even though he’s 16. Though he seems to be gradually entertaining the thought more and more. So for now, we’re a two-car family–something we haven’t been since before the girls were born.

 

On the one hand, it’s a nice position to be in. There have been more and more times lately where we’ve been trying to figure out how to get everyone to where they need to be with just one vehicle at our disposal. And it will offer more flexibility–we could drive separately to work if we want to.

 

But at the same time, it’s weird. It almost feels unnatural because when I head out of the house to go to the store for groceries, I’ve got a choice of which car to take. It’s totally against the norm, or at least the norm we’ve been living for 12-plus years.

 

I know what most of you are saying: this is normal. This is how most of the world lives. Well, we’re not most of the world. We’ve been happy with one car. We’ve been making things work with one car. And, moreover, we’ve been only paying insurance on one car.

 

Oh yeah. There’s that part. In the same year that we finished paying for the van, we’ve got another car and double the insurance. That’s how things work, I suppose. One step forward, but a half-step back.

 

See you tomorrow.